Sounds from Space

 

Sounds from Space Ships and Space Stations 1966 - 1975

This section is dedicated to signals received from Space Ships and Space Stations. Most of them were manned missions or missions in preparation for later manned missions. As there is a separate section dedicated to amateur-radio-transmissions from Space Ships and Space Stations the recordings below are from non-ham-radio transmissions.

My special thanks to Alois Ochojski DL3PD/SK, Sven Grahn, Dick Daniels W4PUJ/SK, Maik Hermenau, Nils von Storch, Dick Flagg AH6NM, Bob Patterson K5DZE, Larry R. Baysinger W4EJA, Federico Manzini, John Pate W1XQ, Bryce Salmi KB1LQC, Loren Moline WA7SKT, Darko Cika 9A3LI, Jos Heymann, Colin Mackella, Marco Bauer, Phil Williams, Alex Spiller, Milen Rangelov and Rolf Niefind DK2ZF for kindly supporting this collection.

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Mission
Date

COSMOS 110
Voskhod 3
1966-015A
#02070

Cosmos 110 was a Soviet spacecraft launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome aboard a Voskhod rocket. It incorporated a re-entry body (capsule) for landing scientific instruments and test objects.
It was a biological satellite that made a sustained biomedical experiment with the dogs Veterok (Little Wind) and Ugolyok (Little Piece of Coal) which were observed by video transmissions and biomedical telemetry. After 22 days in orbit around the Earth, they were safely landed.

Feb 22rd 1966

This FSK-PDM signal was received on 19.984 MHz by Sven Grahn.

This is another recoding of Cosmos 110 also called Voskhod 3.
The FSK-PDM signal was received on 19.984 MHz on March 5
th 1966 at 21:26 UTC by Sven Grahn.

Gemini-8
1966-020A
#02105

 (crew: Neil Armstrong and David Scott)

Gemini 8 was the sixth crewed Earth-orbiting spacecraft of the Gemini series. The recording was done during the execution of its primary mission objective: to perform rendezvous and four docking tests with the Agena target vehicle. Recording is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

Mar 16th 1966

Gemini 9 ATDA
“Angry alligator”
1966-046A
#02186

The Gemini 9 Augmented Target Docking Adapter (ATDA) was launched from Cape Canaveral using an Atlas-Agena D rocket. The spacecraft was successfully injected into a near-circular 304 km orbit, but telemetry signals indicated that the launch shroud, which covered the docking adaptor, had separated but had not been jettisoned. This was confirmed when Gemini 9 was launched two days later and the astronauts observed the launch shroud still on the ATDA blocking the docking port, looking, according to Tom Stafford, like an "angry alligator". Rendezvous within 8 meters of the ATDA was achieved by Gemini 9 on the third revolution. The shroud had not jettisoned because the lanyards had been installed improperly with the loose ends taped down, due to "insufficiently detailed" instructions. Plans to cut the fiber glass shroud loose were considered but discarded as too dangerous to the astronauts. The flight plan was then revised and Gemini 9 completed two different equi-period rendezvous maneuvers with the ATDA. The ATDA was left in a 290 x 300 km orbit.
The Augmented Target Docking Adapter had been prepared as a backup target in case of an Agena Target Vehicle failure. The ATDA was a short cylinder consisting of a target docking adapter cone mounted on front and containing a communications system, a guidance and control system, and a reaction control system. It also had running lights, but unlike the Gemini Agena Target Vehicles, the ATDA was not stabilized.
The Gemini program was designed as a bridge between the Mercury and Apollo programs, primarily to test equipment and mission procedures in Earth orbit and to train astronauts and ground crews for future Apollo missions. The general objectives of the program included: long duration flights in excess of the requirements of a lunar landing mission; rendezvous and docking of two vehicles in Earth orbit; the development of operational proficiency of both flight and ground crews; the conduct of experiments in space; extravehicular operations; active control of reentry flight path to achieve a precise landing point; and onboard orbital navigation. Each Gemini mission carried two astronauts into Earth orbit for periods ranging from 5 hours to 14 days. The program consisted of 10 crewed launches, 2 unmanned launches, and 7 target vehicles, at a total cost of approximately 1,280 million dollars.
Gemini-9 ATDA telemetry recorded on 215-260 MHz in the 60's by R.S. (Dick) Flagg at the University of Florida Student Satellite Tracking Station.
This recording was kindly provided by Sven Grahn with permission of R.S. (Dick) Flagg.

June 1st 1966

Gemini-9
1966-047A
#02191

 (crew: Tom Stafford, Eugene Cernan)

This US mission faced some problems but nevertheless with a duration of more than 2 hours a new record for an EVA was established. Gemini-9 also tried to dock with ATDA, a test satellite. It returned to Earth on June 6th. Audio received on June 3rd 1966 by Dick Flagg (currently AH6NM) on 296.8 MHz at the University of Florida Student Satellite Tracking Station. Recording provided by Sven Grahn.

June 3rd 1966

Apollo 1
AS-204

(crew:
Virgil Grissom, Edward White, Roger Chaffee)

Apollo 1 (initially designated AS-204) was the first manned mission of the U.S. Apollo manned lunar landing program. The planned low Earth orbital test of the Apollo Command/Service Module never made its target launch date of February 21st 1967, because a cabin fire during a launch rehearsal test on January 27th 1967 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 34 killed all three crew members—Command Pilot Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, Senior Pilot Edward H. White II, and Pilot Roger B. Chaffee. The name Apollo 1, chosen by the crew, was officially retired by NASA in commemoration of
Enclosed recording of German broadcast news of January 28th 1967 were recorded and kindly provided by Rolf DK2ZF.

January 27th 1967

COSMOS 186
1967-105A
#03014

Cosmos 186 incorporated a re-entry capsule for landing scientific instruments and test objects. Automatic mating of satellites in orbit was accomplished by Cosmos 186 and Cosmos 188 on October 30th 1967. As a test flight for a later manned spacecraft mutual search, approach, mooring, and docking of 2 satellites were automatically performed. After 3.5 hr of joint flight, the satellites parted on a command sent from the earth and continued to orbit separately. Finally on October 31st 1976, Cosmos 186 made a soft landing in a predetermined region of the USSR.
The CW-PDM signal was received on 20.008 MHz on October 30
th 1967 by Sven Grahn. The transmitter was commanded off at 14:20 UTC .

Oct 27th 1967

COSMOS 212
1968-029A
#03183

Cosmos 212 was one of a series of Soviet earth satellites whose purpose was to study outer space, the upper layers of the atmosphere, and the earth. It was based on a Soyuz 7K OK structure. Scientific data and measurements were relayed to earth by multichannel telemetry systems equipped with space-borne memory units. As a test flight for later manned spacecrafts, Cosmos 212 and Cosmos 213 automatically docked in orbit on April 15th 1968. Both satellites landed on Soviet territory.

April 14th 1968

The CW-PDM signal received on 20.008 MHz on April 14th 1968 by Sven Grahn. The transmitter was commanded off at 17:44:02 UTC.

This is another recording of Cosmos 212 . The CW-PDM signal was received on 20.008 MHz on April 15th 1968 by Sven Grahn. The transmitter was commanded off at 14:10:49 UTC.

Soyuz-3
1968-094A
#03516

(crew: Georgiy Timofeyevich Beregovoy)

Soyuz 3 had a command module (recoverable portion of the ship) and a work compartment separated by an air lock. It was piloted by cosmonaut Lieutenant-Colonel Georgiy Timofeyevich Beregovoy. Soyuz 3 went into a co-orbit with Soyuz 2, performed a radio search for it, and accomplished an automatic approach to it until they were 200 m apart. Repeated manual approaches toward Soyuz 2 were made, reducing the difference in velocity between the two afts to less than 1 mph. However, actual docking was not accomplished. Television coverage of the operations was provided by external cameras. Soyuz 2 landed and Soyuz 3 continued its flight. During the flight, different modes of orientation were tested, regular TV reports were made from orbit, and scientific and technological experiments were performed. Finally Soyuz 3 made a soft landing in a predetermined area of the U.S.S.R.

Octc 26th 1968

Enclosed telemetry signal was received on October 29th 1968 by Sven Grahn.

Enclosed CW-PDM telemetry signal was received on 20.008 MHz on October 29th 1968 by Sven Grahn. The reception ends when the transmitter was commanded-off at 18:14:26 UTC.

Apollo 7
1968-089A
#03486

(crew: Walter Schirra, Jr, Donn Eisele, Walter Cunningham)

Apollo 7 was the first crewed flight of the Apollo spacecraft. The primary objectives of the Earth orbiting mission were to demonstrate Command and Service Module (CSM), crew, launch vehicle, and mission support facilities performance and to demonstrate CSM rendezvous capability. The recording contains comments from Mission Control on pictures sent from Apollo-7. The recording was done during a spacewalk of Astronaut Schweickart. Recording is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

Oct 11th 1968

Apollo 8
CSM-103
1968-118A
#03626

(crew: William Anders, James Lovell, Frank Borman)

Apollo 8 was the first manned mission to fly and orbit the Moon. Originally it wasn't going to the Moon but was supposed to have a low-earth orbit to test the Lunar Module and Command Module. However, since the Lunar Module wasn't ready, NASA decided to change the mission objectives and send Apollo 8 to orbit the Moon 10 times. The crew William Anders, James Lovell and Frank Borman was retrained in record time for a completely new mission. They were the first three humans to see the dark side of the Moon and their voyage was the first ever to escape Earth's gravitational force and visit another celestial body.  On Christmas Eve 1968, when approaching lunar sunrise, the 3 crew members sent a famous broadcast message back to Earth when taking turns reading the first 10 verses from the book of Genesis. Audio courtesy of NASA (3MB).

Dec 21st 1968

Each of the Apollo Command Modules carried an onboard tape recorder called the DSE (Data Storage Equipment). It was a closed tape machine which recorded engineering data as well as onboard voice – especially when the spacecraft was behind the Moon, and out of contact with the Earth. The tape was periodically “dumped" (replayed at high speed) to the tracking stations. During the mission, someone at Honeysuckle Creek took copies of segments of onboard audio to make a highlights tape, covering
LOS at Lunar Encounter,
preparation for LOI-1 (Lunar Orbit Insertion) burn
the LOI-1 burn,
end of successful LOI burn,
AOS (Acquisition of Signal) at Honeysuckel Creek (1st  orbit),
preparations for TEI burn to leave lunar orbit
start of TEI (Trans Earth Injection) burn
end of TEI burn "we're going home".

All recordings kindly provided by Colin Mackellar.

Apollo 9
1969-018A
#03769

(crew: James McDivitt, David Scott, Russell Schweickart )

Apollo 9 was the third crewed Apollo flight and the first crewed flight to include the Lunar Module (LM). The primary objective of the mission was to test all aspects of the Lunar Module in Earth orbit, including operation of the LM as an independent self-sufficient spacecraft and performance of docking and rendezvous maneuvers. The recording was done during a spacewalk of Astronaut Schweickart. Recording is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

Mar 3rd 1969

Apollo 10
1969-043A
#03941

(crew: Thomas P. Stafford, John W. Young, Eugene A. Cernan)

Apollo 10 was the second Apollo mission to orbit the Moon, and the first to travel to the Moon with the full Apollo spacecraft, consisting of the Command and Service Module (CSM-106, "Charlie Brown") and the Lunar Module (LM-4, "Snoopy"). The recording includes in orbit comments of Astronaut Cernan. Recording is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

May 18th 1969

Soyuz-4
1968-004A
#03654

(crew: Vladimir A. Shatalov)

Soyuz 4, piloted by cosmonaut Lieutenant-Colonel Vladimir A. Shatalov, was the first manned spacecraft to be launched by the U.S.S.R. during the winter and had an enhanced water-landing capability. On January 16th, during its 34th orbit, Soyuz 4 began a docking exercise with Soyuz 5, which was on its 18th orbit. When the automatic system had brought the ships within 99 m of one another, a manual approach of Soyuz 4 was completed. While docked, the ships completely interlocked controls, power, and telephones. On the 51st orbit of Soyuz 4, cosmonauts Ye. V. Khrunov and A. S. Yeliseyev of Soyuz 5 passed into the orbital work compartment of their ship, donned pressure suits, opened the outer hatch, and floated and climbed hand over hand using handrails from Soyuz 5 through the opened hatch and into Soyuz 4. TV cameras recorded coverage of the whole procedure, both inside and outside the ships. The two ships remained docked for 4 hr and 35 min and were hailed in Soviet announcements as the world's first space station. Soyuz 4 returned to earth after 3 days, carrying a crew of three men instead of one.
The CW-PDM telemetry signal including biomed subcommutation was received on 20.008 MHz on January 16
th 1969 at about 16:00 UTC by Sven Grahn.

Jan 14th 1969

Apollo 11

Command & Service Module
CSM-107
1969-059A
#04039

Lunar Module
LM/EASEP
1969-059C
#04041

(crew: Neil. A. Armstrong, Edwin E. Aldrin, Michael Collins)

Apollo 11 was the first manned mission to land on the moon. The LM (landing module) spacecraft transmitted at S-band with a carrier frequency of 2282.5 MHz both live television (FM modulated) as well as telemetry (on PM modulated sub-carriers). This communication system was collectively referred to as the Unified S-Band Communication System. Alan Bean, who travelled to the moon aboard Apollo 12 and was the 4th man on the moon, painted pictures of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Reprints are still available. You can find a picture if you click on the icon to the right.

Jul 16th 1969

The audio file enclosed documents the successful launch sequence. Recorded on July 16th 1969.

The famous words of Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, when he stepped on the moon. Recorded on July 20th 1969.

The second man to step on the moon was Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin. This video shows him climbing down the ladder. This video was received by Parkes Observatory in Australia. Video courtesy of NASA.

President Nixon talks with the Astronauts and wished for ".. peace and tranquility on the Earth." This video was received by Parkes Observatory in Australia. Video courtesy of NASA.

Vinyl single "First man on the moon" side 1 includes the speech of J.F.Kennedy announcing the plan to go to the moon. Record provided by Maik Hermenau.

Vinyl single "First man on the moon" side 2 includes the launch of Apollo 11 and landing of Eagle. Record provided by Maik Hermenau.

Part 1 of a report in German language about the first manned mission to the moon, Vinyl LP "Original Dokumente vom Weg zum Mond" war 1970 eine Beilageder Zeitschrift "Bunte Illustrierte". Record provided by Maik Hermenau (11 minutes).

Part 2 of a report in German language about the first manned mission to the moon, Vinyl LP "Original Dokumente vom Weg zum Mond" war 1970 eine Beilageder Zeitschrift "Bunte Illustrierte". Record provided by Maik Hermenau (15 minutes).

On July 21th 1969 03:51 UTC Larry Bassinger, a ham radio amateur with the callsign W4EJA living in Louisville, Kentucky, USA made a remarkable accomplishment:
He was able to receive the VHF radio transmission from astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin directly while they were walking on the moon. Larry used modified surplus radio equipment and a home-brew corner reflector antenna built with chicken wire. He received the 259.7 MHz AM transmitter in the backpack of Armstrong which he used to communicate with the Lunar Module. In enclosed recording one can hear the voice of Armstrong and also that of Aldrin because the backpack of Armstrong received also the voice of Aldrin on 279.0 MHz in FM and retransmitted it also to the LM. Recording kindly provided by Larry Baysinger.

Apollo 12

(crew: Charles "Pete" Conrad, Richard "Dick" F. Gordon, Alan L. "Al" Bean)

CSM-108
1969-099A
#04225

This was the 2nd mission of Apollo with a landing on the moon. The rocket was struck twice (36 seconds and 52 seconds after launch) by a lightning. You can hear the launch campaign including the conversation about the lightning strikes in the first audio recording.
The second audio files documents communication between LM (the lunar module with the nickname "Intrepid") and Houston ground control during the final descent phase (last 3 minutes) and the touch down on the moon (110 h, 32 min and 36 sec mission elapsed time).
The crew returned safely on November 24
th 1969.
I extracted the recordings from the NASA audio collection.
Alan L. Bean was the 4th man on the moon. After he left NASA he became an artist and started painting beautiful scenes of the moon. Enclosed a picture of himself which he named "A New Frontier".

Nov 14th 1969

Apollo 13

aborted third manned mission to the moon (crew: James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., Fred W. Haise, Jr. )

CSM-109
1970-029A
#04371

This aborted 3rd manned mission to moon ended almost fatal. Due to an explosion of the oxygen tank in the service module the mission had to be aborted and luckily the crew returned safely on April 17th 1970. See here a short movie of the damaged service module when clicking on the picture to the right.

Apr 11th 1970

First recording includes the famous words of J. Swigert after the explosion of the tank: "Houston, we've had a problem here." The second recording is the report of the crew of the damage of the service module. Recordings are part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

Apollo 16

(crew: John W. Young, Charles M. Duke, Jr., Thomas K. Mattingly, II)

CSM-113
1972-031A
CASPER
#06000

Apollo 16 was the fifth mission in which humans walked on the lunar surface and returned to Earth. On April 21st 1972 two astronauts (Apollo 16 Commander John W. Young and LM pilot Charles M. Duke, Jr.) landed in the Descartes region of the Moon in the Lunar Module (LM) while the Command and Service Module (CSM) (with CM pilot Thomas K. Mattingly, II) continued in lunar orbit. During their stay on the Moon, the astronauts set up scientific experiments, took photographs, and collected lunar samples. Enclosed video shows the LM (named Orion) taking off from the Moon on April 24th. The astronauts returned to Earth safely on April 27th. Video clip by Colin Mackellar from JSC-supplied video.

Apr 16th 1972

The first recording was made while J.W. Young was collecting rocks on the lunar surface while the second recording was made while he tested the lunar rover. Recording are part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

In enclosed audio recording from Honeysuckle Creek you can heat John Young and Charlie Duke as they descend towards Descartes, starting at about 104:26:40 GET, until just after landing. Recoding is from a compact cassette recording made at Honeysuckle during Apollo 16 by Bryan Sullivan, digitized and kindly provided by Colin Mackellar.

Before EVA 2, comms lines from Houston to Honeysuckle are lost, though lines from Honeysuckle to Houston (via Goddard) are not affected. Sitting inside Orion and having their beakfast, John Young and Charlie Duke have been discussing with Capcom Tony England the upcoming EVA. It takes a little while for it to become obvious that they aren’t hearing anything back from Houston. In order to inform the crew what is happening, Honeysuckle’s Operations Supervisor, John Saxon, pushes his ‘Press to Talk’ Switch to send his voice to the transmitter, becoming the only Australian to speak with someone on the Moon. Recording kindly provided by Colin Mackellar.

Apollo 17
CSM-114
1972-096A
#06300

(crew: Eugene A. Cernan, Harrison H. Schmitt, Ronald E. Evans)

Apollo 17 was the 6th and last Apollo mission during which humans walked on the lunar surface. On December 11th 1972 commander Cernan and lunar module (LM) pilot Schmitt landed in the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon. The Command and Service Module (CSM) with its pilot Evans continued in its lunar orbit. During their stay on the Moon, the astronauts set up scientific experiments, took photographs, drove around with the rover and collected lunar samples. The LM took off from the Moon on December 14th and the astronauts returned to Earth on December 19th.

Dec 7th 1972

Enclosed voice transmission of Apollo-17 while in earth orbit was received on 296.8 MHz on December 7th 1972 at 07:08 UTC by R.S. (Dick) Flagg and Sven Grahn in Titusville, Florida.
This recording was kindly provided by Sven Grahn with permission of R.S. (Dick) Flagg.

Enclosed voice transmission of Apollo-17 while in lunar  orbit was received on 2287.5 MHz on December 12th 1972 by R.S. (Dick) Flagg and Sven Grahn in Biven's Arm, Gainesville, Florida.
This recording was kindly provided by Sven Grahn with permission of R.S. (Dick) Flagg.

This recording of the Apollo 17 descent and lunar landing was made at Honeysuckle Creek and was preserved by Alan Foster. Goldstone was tracking, and so this was recorded from the Net 1 feed. It begins as Challenger is at 57,000 feet. Touchdown is 10'40" into the recording. The audio quality on this recording is quite good. Ron Evans in the orbiting Command Module is not heard on this circuit from Goldstone, whereas the Cernan and Schmitt – and Houston – can hear him. Digitized from the original tapes and kindly provided by Colin Mackellar.

Enclosed recording of the audio link between the team on the moon while driving around with the rover and the ground staff on Earth was recorded on December 13th 1972 around 05:00 UTC by Bob K5DZE (ex DA1EZ). It was actually a live re-transmission on 7.524 MHz in SSB between 2 NASA stations. You can hear in this excellent 20 minutes long recording the slow but strong fading of the signal coming from the moon. Many thanks to Bob K5DZE for kindly providing this interesting recording.

Skylab 1
1973-027A
#06633
Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS)

The Skylab (SL) was a manned, orbiting spacecraft composed of five parts:
the Apollo telescope mount (ATM),
the multiple docking adapter (MDA),
the airlock module (AM),
 the instrument unit (IU),
 and the orbital workshop (OWS) in the form of a cylinder.
The ATM was a solar observatory, positioned 90 deg from the longitudinal axis after insertion into orbit and it provided attitude control and experiment pointing for the rest of the cluster. It was attached to the MDA and AM at one end of the OWS. The retrieval and installation of film used in the ATM was accomplished by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). The MDA served as a dock for the command and service modules, which served as personnel taxis to the Skylab. The AM provided an airlock between the MDA and the OWS, and contained controls and instrumentation. The IU, which was used only during launch and the initial phases of operation, provided guidance and sequencing functions for the initial deployment of the ATM, solar arrays, etc. The OWS was a modified Saturn 4B stage suitable for long duration manned habitation in orbit. It contained provisions and crew quarters necessary to support three-person crews for periods of up to 84 days each. The Skylab OWS itself was launched on May 14
th 1973. All parts were capable of unmanned, in-orbit storage, reactivation, and reuse.

May 14th 1973

Enclosed signal was received on 230.4 MHz on May 14th 1973 at 17:55 UTC by Sven Grahn.

Enclosed signal was received on 237.0 MHz on June 22nd 1973 at 21:35 UTC by Sven Grahn.

Skylab was first manned during the period May 25th to June 22nd 1973 by the crew of the SL-2 mission (1973-032A) with the astronauts Charles Conrad, Paul J. Weitz, Dr. Joseph P. Kerwin.
John Saxon recorded these intercom loops at Honeysuckle Creek during Skylab passes and added a running commentary.
First recording was during orbit #3080. (4:42 Capcom Bruce McCandless calls through Guam, 9:30 Madrid replaying data,  10:00 Guam LOS all links,  12:45 AOS at Honeysuckle,  13:56 Capcom Bruce McCandless calls through Honeysuckle,  21:22 LOS, all links, 24:30 HSK begins to play back data,  27:10 John accidentally broadcasts his commentary on Alpha,  30:10 Vanguard (Tracking ship)).
Second recording was during orbit #3081.
Recordings kindly provided by Colin Mackellar.

Next, it was manned during the period July 28th to September 25th 1973 by the crew of the SL-3 mission (1973-050A) with the astronauts Alan L. Bean, Dr. Owen K. Garriott, Jack R. Lousma.

The 3rd and final manned period was from November 16th 1973 to February 8th 1974, when it was manned by the crew from the SL-4 mission (1973-090A) with the astronauts Gerald P. Carr, Dr. Edward G. Gibson, William R. Pogue.

Soyuz 14
1974-051A
#07361

(crew: Pavel Popovich, Yury Artukh 

Soyuz 14 was a manned Soviet mission launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome with cosmonauts Pavel Popovich and Yury Artukhin aboard. It docked with the Salyut 3 space station for 15 days, 17 hours.
Enclosed voice transmission of Pavel Popovich calling "Zarya ya Berkut" was received on 121.75 MHz on July 3
rd 1974 by Sven Grahn.

July 3rd 1974

Soyuz 16
1974-096A
#07561

(crew: Filipchenko, Rukavishnikov)

Soyuz 16 was a manned Soviet mission launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome with cosmonauts Filipchenko and Rukavishnikov aboard. It performed tests of the modernized onboard systems in preparation of the 1975 joint Apollo-Soyuz Test Program (ASTP) and returned on December 8th 1974.
Enclosed voice transmission from Filipchenko calling "Ya Buran ..." was received on 121.750 MHz on December 5
th 1974 at 13:35 UTC by Sven Grahn.

Dec 2nd 1974

Salyut 4
Salyut-4
Salute 4
DOS 4
1974-104A
#07591

The Salyut 4 space station was the second successful Zarya station and launched on December 26th 1974 in an orbit with an apogee of 355 km and a perigee of 343 km. The orbital period was 101.3 minutes. It was at an inclination of 51.6 degrees. The main experiments on Salyut 4 were an X-ray instrument, often called the Filin telescope, and optical sensors. Salyut 4 hosted two crews (missions Soyuz 17 and Soyuz 18) for 30 days and 63 days respectively. It reentered the Earth's atmosphere on February 2nd 1977.
Enclosed CW-PDM signal was received on 20.008 MHz on November 21
st 1976 by Sven Grahn.

Dec 26th 1974

Soyuz 17
1975-001A
#07604

(crew: Grechko, Gubarev)

Soyuz 17 was a manned Soviet mission launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome and docked with the Salyut 4 space station. The flight crew consisted of Cosmonauts Grechko and Gubarev. It returned to Earth almost 30 days later and landed 110 km NE of Tselinograd on February 9th 1975 at 11:03 UTC.
While Soyuz 17 was in final approach to dock with Salyut 4 enclosed voice signal was received on 121.75 MHz on January 11
th 1975 by Sven Grahn.

Jan 11th 1975

ASTP-Apollo
1975-066A
#08032

(crew: R. Thomas Giuli, Chester M. Lee)

The United States and the U.S.S.R. launched an Apollo spacecraft and a Soyuz spacecraft, respectively, as a joint effort called the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). The Soyuz spacecraft was launched first, with a two-man crew who maneuvered their spacecraft into a docking orbit. The Apollo spacecraft was launched 7.5h later, with a three-man crew who placed their spacecraft into a proper configuration for docking with the Soyuz spacecraft. The docking of the two spacecraft occurred on July 17th 1975.

After docking the crew members rotated between the two spacecraft and conducted various mainly ceremonial activities and TV reports.

After being docked for nearly 44 hours, Apollo and Soyuz parted for the first time and were station-keeping at a range of 50 meters. The Apollo crew placed its craft between Soyuz and the sun so that the diameter of the service module formed a disk which blocked out the sun. After this experiment Apollo moved towards Soyuz for the second docking.

Three hours later Apollo and Soyuz undocked for the second and final time. The spacecraft moved to a 40 m station-keeping distance so that an ultraviolet absorption experiment could be performed. With all the joint flight activities completed, the ships went on their separate ways.

Jul 15th 1975

Recording is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Mission
Date

If you have further recordings from space objects please let me know. I will be happy to add them to my homepage. Many thanks in advance.

Vy 55 & 73 de Matthias DD1US               


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