Sounds from Space

 

Sounds from Space Ships and Space Stations 1957 - 1965

This section is dedicated to signals received from Space Ships and Space Stations. Most of them were manned missions or missions in preparation for later manned missions. As there is a separate section dedicated to amateur-radio-transmissions from Space Ships and Space Stations the recordings below are from non-ham-radio transmissions.

My special thanks to Alois Ochojski DL3PD/SK, Sven Grahn, Dick Daniels W4PUJ/SK, Maik Hermenau, Nils von Storch, Dick Flagg AH6NM, Bob Patterson K5DZE, Larry R. Baysinger W4EJA, Federico Manzini, John Pate W1XQ, Bryce Salmi KB1LQC, Loren Moline WA7SKT, Darko Cika 9A3LI, Jos Heymann, Colin Mackella, Marco Bauer, Phil Williams, Alex Spiller, Milen Rangelov and Rolf Niefind DK2ZF for kindly supporting this collection.

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Mission
Date

Sputnik 2
Sputnik II
Physical lab
PS 2
#00003
(1957-002A)
(1957 Beta 1)

Sputnik 2 was the first spaceship which brought an animal in space. The elliptical orbit had an apogee of 1770 km and an apogee of 320 km. Sputnik II circulated the Earth in 103,7 minutes.
Sputnik 2 was a three-part conical satellite with a hight of 1.2m and was comprised of the following sections:
- a cylindrical container for scientific equipment
- a spherical container for batteries, 2 transmitters and radiotelemetry systems
- a sealed cabin for the a dog named Laika
Laika lived for one week and part of the downlink telemetry was her heartbeat. She died on November 10
th 1957 when oxygen in her capsule was exhausted.
Sputnik II transmitted for 7 days on the frequencies 20.005 MHz and 40.010 MHz.
Sputnik 2 decayed on April 14
th 1958. This recording was provided by Alois DL3PD/SK.

Nov 3rd 1957

Enclosed is the recording of the heartbeat of the dog Laika aboard Sputnik 2. The recording is from vinyl no. 2 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

In June 2010 I received from Dick W4PUJ/SK
(ex WA4DGU) together with a number of other unique audio recordings enclosed recording of Sputnik II. Thanks Dick for providing this recording. Dick became silent key on February 14
th 2012.

Sputnik 4
Sputnik IV
Korabl-Sputnik 1
1960-005A
#00034

Sputnik 4 (also called Korabl-Sputnik 1) was launched from former U.S.S.R from Baykonur Cosmodrome into an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 675 km and a perigee of 280 km.
This first of a series of spacecraft used to investigate the means for manned space flight, contained scientific instruments, a television system, and a self-sustaining biological cabin with a dummy of a man. The spacecraft was designed to study the operation of the life support system and the stresses of flight. The spacecraft radioed both extensive telemetry and prerecorded voice communications. After four days of flight, the reentry cabin was separated from its service module and retro-rockets were fired, but because of an incorrect attitude the spacecraft did not reenter the atmosphere.

May 15th 1960

This recording of Sputnik IV was kindly provided by Dick Daniels W4PUJ/SK.

 

Sputnik 5
Sputnik V
Korabl Sputnik 2
1960-011A
#00055

Sputnik 5 (also called Korabl-Sputnik 2) was launched from former U.S.S.R from Baykonur Cosmodrome into an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 325 km and a perigee of 287 km.
This spacecraft was the second in a series of spacecraft designed to further the development of an Earth orbiting system for the planned manned space program.
The spacecraft carried two dogs, Strelka (eng. arrow, deut. Pfeil) and Belka (eng. squirrel, deut. Eichhörnchen), plus a grey rabbit, rats, mice, flies, plants, fungi, microscopic water plants, and seeds. Sputnik 5 returned telemetry and TV images showing the dogs' physical condition. Reported  transmission frequencies were 19.995 MHz and 83 MHz.
After a one day flight, the spacecraft and both dogs were successfully recovered. Strelka (see right picture) and Belka became the first living creatures to orbit the Earth and return safely.

Aug 19th 1960

This recording of the telemetry of Sputnik V was recorded on 19.995 MHz bey an unknown source. Recording kindly provided by John Pate W1XQ.

Vostok-3 No.1
Sputnik 9
Korabl Sputnik 4
1961-008A
#00091

This Space Ship Vostok-3 No.1 carried a dog named Chernuska in space. Besides Chernuska also onboard was a dummy cosmonaut, mice and a guinea pig. The flight lasted for a single orbit, and a successful recovery was made. Recording provided by Alois DL3PD/SK.

Mar 9th 1961

Russian
Spaceship
Vostok 1
1961-012A
#00103

 (crew: Jurij Gagarin)

The first man in space: Jurij Gagarin. He circulated the Earth in his Russian Spaceship Vostok 1 during his flight which had a duration of 108 minutes. Recording provided by Alois DL3PD/SK.

Apr 12th 1961

Vinyl single made in USSR
"12-IV 1961 CCCP Gagarin" side 1 with Russian comments. Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

Vinyl single made in USSR
"12-IV 1961 CCCP Gagarin" side 2 with German comments. Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

Colorvox "Schallbildkarte"
"Reportage über den Weltraumflug Juri Gagarins". Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

Report in German language about the phase between the first artificial satellite Sputnik 1 and the first man in space Juri Gagarin. From a Schallfolie "Der Weg in den Kosmos" which was provided in the 60s by a Eastern German magazine called "Frösi". Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

US Spaceship
Freedom 7
MR-3
MERCR3

(crew: Alan B. Shepard Jr.)

Alan B. Shepard Jr. (1924-1998) was the first American in space. His flight in a Mercury capsule on top of a Redstone-MRLV rocket had a duration of 15 minutes and 28 seconds. As this was a ballistic suborbital flight reaching an altitude of 187 km it did not get a International nor a NORAD designator. His recovery at sea was viewed on live TV. 10 years later Al Shepard was the commander of Apollo 14 and landed on the Moon.

May 5th 1961

These recording are from vinyls no. 24 and no. 25 which were included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. They include sequences of the launch campaign as well as Shepard's voice while he was in orbit ("What a beautiful view ..."). Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Liberty Bell 7
MR-4
MERCR4

(crew: Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom)

Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom (1926-1967) was the second American in space. His flight in a Mercury Redstone 4 (MR-4) had a duration of 15 minutes and 37 seconds. The main configuration differences from the MR-3 spacecraft was the addition of a large viewing window and an explosively actuated side hatch (which actually failed during landing). As this was a ballistic suborbital flight reaching an altitude of 187 km it did not get a International nor a NORAD designator.

July 21st 1961

This recording is from vinyl no. 27 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. They include sequences of the launch campaign as well as Shepard's voice while he was in orbit ("What a beautiful view ..."). Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Russian
Spaceship
Vostok 2
Sputnik 12
1961-019A
#00168

(crew: Gherman S. Titov)

Russian Spaceship Vostok 2 (3KA-4) with cosmonaut Gherman S. Titov was launched by a Vostok rocket from Baikonur (U.S.S.R.) into an 166x232 km orbit with 65° inclination. The flight lasted 1 day and 1 hour during with G.S. Titov circulated the earth 17 times.

Aug 6th 1961

This recording is from vinyl no. 28 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. It includes multiple recordings of Titov's voice while he was in orbit. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

US Spaceship
Friendship 7
Mercury Atlas 6
1962-003A
#00240

(crew: John Glenn)

Report in German language about the first US astronaut John Glenn circulating in MA 6 (Mercury Atlas 6) the Earth 3 times. Heftbeilage der Hauszeitschrift "Die Brücke" Nr.2 vom Oktober 1962 der Pharmazeutischen Medizinischen Abteilung der Farbwerke Hoechst AG. Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

Feb 20th 1962

The voice of John Glenn "Roger, zero G and I feel fine, capsule is turning around". Recording courtesy of NASA.

The voice of John Glenn "We got speed - John Glenn". Recording courtesy of NASA.

Mercury Atlas 7
MA-7
Aurora 7

1962-019A
#00295

(crew: M. Scott Carpenter)

Mercury Atlas 7 (MA-7) was the second orbital flight of an American rocket.

May 24th 1962

A curious event which occurred during Glenn's (MA-6) flight was his report of "fire flies" when he entered the sunrise portion of an orbit. Although this phenomenon was a mystery at the time, it was resolved during the flight of Mercury Atlas 7 when Scott Carpenter accidentally tapped the wall of the spacecraft with his hand, releasing many of the so-called "fire flies". The source was determined to be frost from the reaction control jets. You can hear his respective report "I have the fire flies"enclosed. Recording courtesy of NASA.

Scott Carpenter greeting: "Hola, amigos, felicitaciones a Mexico y especialmente a mi amigos de Guaymas." Recording courtesy of NASA.

Enclosed are multiple parts of recordings of Scott Carpenter aboard Aurora 7. Thes are from vinyl no. 44 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Russian
Spaceship
Vostok 3
1962 Alpha Mu 1
1962-036A
#00363

(crew: Andriyan G. Nikolayev)

Russian Spaceship Vostok 3 with cosmonaut Andriyan G. Nikolayev was launched by a modified SS6 rocket from Baikonur (U.S.S.R.) into an 183x251 km orbit with 65° inclination. The flight lasted 4 days during with Andriyan G. Nikolayev circulated the earth 64 times. Vostok 3 featured a tracking beacon on 19.995 MHz and further transmitters on 20.006 MHz and 143.625 MHz.

Aug 11th 1962

This set of recording is from vinyl no. 48 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. It includes recordings of Nikolayev's voice while he was in orbit. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Russian
Spaceship
Vostok 4
1962-037A
#00365

(crew: Pavel R. Popovich)

Russian Spaceship Vostok 4 with cosmonaut Pavel R. Popovich was launched by a modified SS6 rocket from Baikonur (U.S.S.R.) into an 180x254 km orbit with 65° inclination. The flight lasted 4 days during with Pavel R. Popovich circulated the earth 48 times. Vostok 4 featured a tracking beacon on 19.990 MHz and further transmitters on 20.006 MHz and 143.625 MHz. Vostok 3 and 4 conducted the first group flight in cosmic space.

Aug 12th 1962

This set of recording is from vinyl no. 49 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. It includes multiple recordings of Popovich's voice while he was in orbit. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Mercury Atlas 8
MA 8
Sigma 7
1962-052A
#00433

 (crew: Walter "Wally" M. Schirra)

Mercury Atlas 8 (MA-8, also Sigma 7) was the third manned orbital flight of the Mercury program. The pilot was Walter M. Schirra, Jr. who called his mission a "textbook flight", the only difficulty having been attaining the correct temperature adjustment on his pressure suit.
The launch which was postponed twice was the first to be relayed live (via the Telstar satellite) to television audiences in Western Europe.
This spacecraft featured the addition of two high-frequency antennas (mounted on the retro package) to assist and maintain spacecraft and ground communications throughout the flight.
Four experiments were conducted as a part of the MA-8 flight. One was a light visibility experiment, similar to those conducted on the two previous missions. The second was a nuclear radiation experiment, in which radiation-sensitive emulsions were used to study the flux and composition of galactic cosmic rays. A third was an investigation, in which the ablation of various materials due to heating during reentry was measured. The final experiment used a 70 mm Hasselblad camera with various filters to gather imagery for assembling a catalog of Earth photography for comparison with similar images obtained by other satellite programs.
The flight was 9 hours 13 minutes and 11 seconds during which Schirra travelled over 230,000 km (completing six orbits) and finally the capsule reentered landing 440 km northeast of Midway Island in the Pacific Ocean.

Oct. 3rd 1962

Enclosed voice transmission of astronaut Walter Schirra onboard Mercury-Atlas-8 was received on 15.016 MHz on October 3rd 1962 by R.S. (Dick) Flagg  in Vermont.

These recordings are from vinyls no. 54 & 55 which were included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. They include multiple recordings of Walter Schirra's voice while he was in orbit as well as the launch campaign. The comments are in Italian language. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Mercury Atlas 9
MA 9
Faith 7
1963-015A
#00576

 (crew: L. Gordon Cooper Jr.)

Mercury Atlas 9 (MA-9, Faith 7) was the fourth and final manned orbital flight of the Mercury program. The pilot was L. Gordon Cooper, Jr. who was also the main subject of the experiments: effects of an extended (1 day) stay in space on the human being. Cooper also became the first to sleep in orbit.

May 15th 1963

Enclosed recording of a comment of L. Gordon Cooper is a courtesy of NASA.

This recording is from vinyl no. 61 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Vostok 6
Wostok 6
1963-023A
#00595

 (crew: Valentina V. Tereshkova)

Vostok 6, the last spacecraft in the USSRs first manned flight series, carried Valentina V. Tereshkova, the first woman in space. Her flight lasted for 3 days and, for most of this time, Vostok 6 flew with Vostok 5 maintaining two-way radio communications and establishing communications with earth at regular intervals. TV pictures of the cosmonauts in their cabins were relayed to earth, and a series of biomedical and scientific experiments were conducted. V. T. Tereshkova used the callsign "Tschaika" (seagull). After completing 48 orbits in 70.7 hours, the spacecraft landed on June 19th 1963.

June 16th 1963

This recording is from vinyl no. 64 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

This recording was made while V. Tereshkova talked with the Primier Khrushchev. Recording is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

Voskhod-1
1964-065A
#00904

(crew: Vladimir M. Komarov, Boris B. Yegorov, Konstatin P. Feoktisov)

Voskhod 1, which carried three men into space, was the first multi-manned flight. The crew members were cosmonauts Vladimir M. Komarov, command pilot, Boris B. Yegorov, physician, and Konstatin P. Feoktisov, scientist. This mission was designed to test the new multi-seat spacecraft, to investigate the capacity of a group of cosmonauts who were specialists in different disciplines of science and engineering, to conduct physical and technical experiments, and to perform an extensive medical-biological investigation program. During the flight, live TV pictures were returned. The life-support systems of the space cabin were felt to be reliable enough to allow the crew to wear overalls instead of the cumbersome spacesuits and helmets. The mission was a success, and a large amount of scientific data was obtained.

Oct. 12th 1964

Enclosed voice transmission from Voskhod-1 was received on 18.035 MHz on October 13th 1964 at 01:55 UTC by R.S. (Dick) Flagg in Gainesville Florida.
This recording was kindly provided by Sven Grahn with permission of R.S. (Dick) Flagg.

Voskhod-1 Morse-code, 18.035 MHz, 0155 UT, October 13th 1964, recording by R.S. (Dick) Flagg in Gainesville Florida.
This recording was kindly provided by Sven Grahn with permission of R.S. (Dick) Flagg.

Voskhod-2
1965-022A
#01274

(crew: Pawel Iwanowitsch Beljajew, Alexej Archipowitsch Leonow )

Voskhod 2, which carried two men into space, was equipped with an extendable air lock that permitted Leonov's exit into space without having to evacuate the main cabin air. It was the first flight with an extra vehicular activity (EVA) and cosmonaut Alexej Archipowitsch Leonow was the first man who left a spacecraft and operated in free space. The other crew member was commander Pawel Iwanowitsch Beljajew. The flight of Voskhod 2 lasted for 26 hours and 16 orbits were completed. A manually controlled reentry was performed because of a malfunction of the automatic orientation devices for the retrofire. The spacecraft landed in a pine forest far north of the target area. After locating the spacecraft, one day was required to cut through the forest and bring the crew out on skis. Overall the mission was a success. After Leonow retired he started to create paintings of his experience in space. Enclosed is a painting of his EVA.

Voskhod-2 transmitted voice on 143.625 MHz, 18.035 MHz and 17.365 MHz and had a beacon transmitter on 19.996 MHz. The 143.625 MHz FM transmissions were used for line-of-sight communications with ground stations while the short-wave frequencies were used to communicate with the spacecraft when it was far from Soviet territory.

March 18th 1965

Enclosed audio file is from a report about the Voskhod-2 focusing on the EVA of Alexej Leonow. Supposedly the radio traffic in the report was recorded during Leonows EVA.

Gemini-4
1965-043A
#01390

 (crew: James McDivitt, Edward White)

Gemini-4 was the second crewed mission of the Gemini series. It was a 4-day, 62-orbit, 98-hr flight. The recording was maade during the first American spacewalk performed by Ed White. Recording is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

June 3rd 1965

Gemini-5
1965-068A
#01516

 (crew: Gordon Cooper,"Pete" Charles Conrad)

Gemini 5 was the third crewed Earth-orbiting spacecraft of the Gemini series. The recording was made while the crew was passing over Hawaii. Recording is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

Aug 21st 1965

Gemini-7
1965-100A
#01812

 (crew: James Lovell
, Frank Borman)

Gemini 7 was the fourth crewed Earth-orbiting spacecraft of the Gemini series, having been launched before Gemini 6A. Its mission priorities were (1) to demonstrate a 2-week flight, (2) to perform stationkeeping with the Gemini launch vehicle stage 2, (3) to evaluate the 'shirt sleeve' environment and the lightweight pressure suit, (4) to act as a rendezvous target for Gemini 6, and (5) to demonstrate controlled reentry close to the target landing point. The crew members had three scientific, four technological, four spacecraft, and eight medical experiments to perform.
Enclosed 1 hour recording of broadcast reports transmitted on HF of the successful reentry and landing of Gemini 7 were kindly provided by Rolf Niefind DK2ZF.

Dec 4th 1965

Gemini-6A
Gemini-6
1965-104A
#01839

 (crew:
Walter Schirra , Thomas Stafford)

Gemini 6A was the 5th crewed Earth-orbiting spacecraft of the Gemini series, having been launched after Gemini 7, with the intent of making rendezvous with Gemini 7 in Earth orbit. This mission was originally designated Gemini 6 and scheduled for launch on October 25th but was cancelled when the Agena target vehicle failed to go into orbit an hour earlier. Gemini 6A was scheduled to launch on December 12th 1965, but the launch was aborted one second after engine ignition because an electrical umbilical separated prematurely. This was the first time an astronaut mission was aborted after ignition start. The mission launched successfully from Complex 19 on December 15th at 13:37 UTC and was inserted into a 161.0 x 259.4 km orbit. At this point Gemini 6A trailed Gemini 7 by about 1900 km. After several maneuvers rendezvous was technically achieved with the two Gemini spacecraft in zero relative motion at a distance of 110 meters. Stationkeeping maneuvers involving the spacecraft circling each other and approaching and backing off continued for 5 hours 19 minutes over three and a half orbits. During the maneuvers, all four astronauts on both spacecraft took turns in the formation flying activities and photographs were taken from both spacecraft. This marked the first time two spacecraft were maneuvered with respect to each other by their crews. Near the end of the 15th revolution the retrorockets were fired and splashdown occurred at 23.58 N, 67.83 W only 13 km from the target. This was the first successful controlled reentry to a predetermined point in the U.S. manned spaceflight program.
Enclosed recordings of broadcast reports transmitted on HF of the initial aborted, the following successful launch of Gemini 6A and the rendezvouz of Gemini-6A and Gemini-7 were kindly provided by Rolf Niefind DK2ZF.

Dec 15th 1965

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Mission
Date

If you have further recordings from space objects please let me know. I will be happy to add them to my homepage. Many thanks in advance.

Vy 55 & 73 de Matthias DD1US               


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