Sounds from Space

 

Sounds from Scientific, Meteorological and Commercial Satellites 1972-1995

This part of my audio collection is dedicated to commercial and scientific satellites. I started this separate section when Greg Roberts, ZS1BI in Cape Town, started to convert some of his old recordings from a tape recorder with elastic belt drives to electronic format. Greg is a retired professional astronomer and since 1957 has been actively involved in the tracking of artificial satellites, both by optical and radio means. Click on his picture to the right to get more information about him and his activities.

Greg Roberts ZS1BI

Many thanks to Greg Roberts ZS1BI for getting this section started and to all the other people who kindly contributed: Alois Ochojski DL3PD/SK, Roy Welch W0SL, Sven Grahn, Kurt Ringel DF7FU, Chris Gross, Mike D. Kenny, Brian Hougesen OZ1SKY, Michael Fletcher OH2AUE, Dale Ireland, Alan Banks, Paul Marsh M0EYT, Patrick DK193WN, Mike Rupprecht DK3WN, Loren Moline WA7SKT, Maik Hermenau, Jean-Louis Rault F6AGR, Dick Flagg AH6NM, Don P. Mitchell, Bill Chaikin KA8VIT, Dick Daniels W4PUJ/SK, Patrick Hajagos, Henk Hamoen PA3GUO, Thomas Koziel DG3IX, Tobias Lindemann, Josef Huber, Tetsu-san JA0CAW, Jan PE0SAT, Nils von Storch, Darko 9A3LI, Federico Manzini, Phil Williams, Jos Heymann, Roland Proesch DF3LZ, Davide D'Aliesio IW0HLG, Giulio Manzoni IV3DTB/9V1FC, Fer Paglia IW1DTU, Enrico Gobbetti IW2AGJ, Raydel Abreu Espinet CM2ESP, Flavio PY2ZX, Frederick W. Krappe, Colin Mackellar, Aitor Conde, Davide D'Aliesio IW0HLG, Jean-Pierre Godet F5YG, Milen Rangelov, Francisco EA7ADI and Luc VE2FXL.

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Launch
Date

Weight

HEOS 2
HEOS-A2
#05814
(1972-005A)

HEOS 2 was built by ESRO (the European Space Research Organisation). This spin stabilized satellite traveled in extremely elongated orbits in order to study the interplanetary magnetic field and solar and cosmic ray particles outside the Earth’s magneto-sphere. It studied especially high latitude magneto-sphere and the region around the northern neutral point. It transmitted telemetry on 136.68 MHz (5.9 W). Control uplink frequency was 148.250 MHz. Both recordings made on August 15th 1973 in AM mode on 136.680 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Jan 31st 1972

123 kg

TD 1A
#05879
(1972-014A)

TD-1A (Thor Delta 1) Astronomical Celestial Observation Satellite. It carried seven experiments devoted to astrophysical studies. Recorded on 137.740 MHz using an SSB receiver on October 30th 1974 by Greg Roberts.

Mar 12th 1972

472 kg

TD-1A received on 136.050 MHz on May 17th 1972 by Greg Roberts.

TD-1A received on October 24th 1973 on 136.050 MHz in AM by Greg Roberts.

LANDSAT 1
(ERTS-1)
#06126
(1972-058A)

Earth Resources Technology Satellite. Its objective was to obtain coverage of the United States and other major land masses with multi-spectral, high spatial resolution (60 m) images of solar radiation reflected from the earth's surface. The tracking beacon transmitted on 137.860 MHz at 2 W. Telemetry on command was transmitted in S-Band on 2229.5 MHz (20 W), 2265.5 MHz (20 W), 2287.5 MHz (1 W). Recorded on Dec 14th 1973 in AM by Greg Roberts.

Jul 23rd 1972

950 kg

Recorded on Dec 14th 1973 in FM by Greg Roberts.

METEC
MTS
(Explorer 46)
#06142
(1972-061A)

METEC (Meteoroid Technology Satellite) measured the meteoroid penetration rates in a bumper-protected target as well as meteoroid velocity and flux distribution. Recorded on 136.320 MHz using an SSB receiver by Greg Roberts.

Aug 13th 1972

90 kg

Recorded on June 7th 1975 on 136.320 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Explorer 46 recorded twice on October 24th 1973 on 136.320 MHz in AM mode by Greg Roberts.

Recorded twice on August 30th 1974 by Greg Roberts.

OAO-3
Copernicus
#06153
(1972-065A)

Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-3, OAO-C) was also known as Copernicus. Frequencies used were 136.260 MHz and 136.440 MHz. Recorded on December 14th 1973 using different demodulators by Greg Roberts.

Aug 21st 1972

2150 kg

OAO-C Copernicus recorded on Oct 24th 1973 in AM probably on 136.440 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Recorded in AM mode on Sept 1st 1975 by Greg Roberts.

NOAA 2
(ITOS-D)
#06235
(1972-082A)

Meteorological satellite providing day and night cloud cover data. NOAA-2 relied entirely on scanning radiometers for imagery. Tracking and telemetry was transmitted with 250 mW on 136.770 MHz. Telemetry on demand was on 137.500 MHz, 137.620 MHz or 1697.500 MHz (5 W). APT transmission recorded on Dec 14th 1973 in FM by Greg Roberts.

The APT signal was decoded and kindly provided by Mark B.

Oct 15th 1972

409 kg

The beacons on the NOAA satellites are relatively powerful and can be heard without much difficulty using the FM mode of receivers. This was shown here on December 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

NOAA 2 ( aka ITOS-D) recorded either on 137.500 MHz or 137.620 MHz in AM mode on August 15th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

NOAA 2 telemetry beacon recorded either on 136.770 MHz in AM mode on October 24th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

ESRO-4
#06285
(1972-092A)

ESRO 4 was cylindrical in shape and was spin stabilized. It transmitted a PCM/PM telemetry mode in three forms: real-time telemetry at 64 bps, tape-recorder playback and high-speed telemetry at 10240 bps. It studied the ionosphere, auroras and solar particles. Recorded on October 24th 1973 in AM on 137.200 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Nov 22nd 1972

115 kg

Aeros 1
Aeros A
#06315
(1972-100A)

Aeros 1 was a German scientific satellite. The AEROS satellite had a circular cylindrical shape, 0.914 m in diameter and 0.710 m in height. It was launched into an elliptical, polar, nearly sun-synchronous earth orbit. The spacecraft was spin stabilized at 10 rpm and oriented with the spin axis toward the sun. The purpose of the mission was to study the state and behavior of the upper atmosphere and ionospheric F region, especially with regard to the influence of solar ultraviolet radiation. Five experiments provided data on the temperature and density of electrons, ions, and neutral particles, the composition of ions and neutral particles, and solar ultraviolet flux.

Aeros 1 transmitted telemetry in PCM/PM mode on 137.26 MHz. The transmit power was 0.15 W when transmitting 512bps and 1.5 W when transmitting 12.8 kbps. The uplink (command) frequency was 148.250 MHz.

I am searching for sound files. Please send them to

Dec 16th 1972

125.7 kg

Meteor 1-14
#06392
(1973-015A)

Meteor 1-14 was the 14th fully operational meteorological satellite in the Soviet Meteor 1 program and the first to transmit over South Africa. Recorded by Greg Roberts.

The APT signal was decoded and kindly provided by Mark Boldyrev.

Mar 20th 1973

2000 kg

NOAA 3
(ITOS-F)
#06920
(1973-086A)

Meteorological satellite providing day and night cloud cover data. Recorded on 137.400 MHz, 137.500 MHz or 137.620 MHz using an SSB receiver by Greg Roberts.

The APT signal was decoded and kindly provided by Mark B.

Nov 6th 1973

746 kg

The second file was recorded on December 14th 1973 in FM by Greg Roberts.

AE-C
(Explorer 51)
#06977
(1973-101A)

Explorer 51 was a scientific satellite studying the high atmosphere. It transmitted on 137.230 MHz. It decayed on December 12th 1978. Recorded on June 7th 1975 in CW by Greg Roberts.

Dec 16th 1973

658 kg

Recorded on June 7th 1975 by Greg Roberts (first in CW and then he switched during the reception to AM).

Tansei 2
Tansei MRT
MS-T2
#07122
(1974-008A)

Tansei 2 was a Japanese satellite with a short mission of only 17 days. It included a magnetic attitude control test system, a housekeeping measurement system and a radio telemetry system. Recorded on February 27nd 1974 in CW on 136.725 MHz by Greg Roberts. In AM nothing could be heard.

Feb 16th 1974

56 kg

ATS-6
ATS-F
#07318
(1974-039A)

ATS-6 (Applications Technology Satellite-6, also called ATS-F) was the world's first educational satellite as well as the first experimental direct broadcast TV satellite (DBS) in a geostationary orbit. The 3 axis stabilized satellite transmitted with 2 Watts and used a 9.15m dish antenna. Recorded on 136.230 MHz by Greg Roberts.

May 30th 1974

930 kg

Recorded on 137.1017 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Hawkeye 1
Injun-F
(Explorer 52)
#07325
(1974-040A)

Hawkeye 1 was also called Neutral Point Explorer and carried space physics experiments including a magnetometer, an energetic plasma analyzer and an ELF-VLF wave instrument. Data were transmitted in real time at frequencies of 136 MHz and 400 MHz at 100 bps (or 200 bps using convolutional codes) plus wideband VLF data. Recorded at 136.290 MHz using an SSB receiver. In the middle of the second recording the receiver was switched to AM. Both files recorded on October 30th 1974 by Greg Roberts.

June 3rd 1974

22.7 kg

Recorded on September 6th 1975 on 136.290 MHz during a near perigee pass by Greg Roberts.

Aeros 2
Aeros B
#07371
(1974-055A)

Aeros 2 was a German scientific satellite. The purpose of its mission was to study the state and behavior of the upper atmosphere and ionospheric F region, especially with regard to the influence of solar ultraviolet radiation. It transmitted on 137.290 MHz. Recorded on June 7th 1975 in AM or FM by Greg Roberts.

Jul 16th 1974

125.7 kg

It was launched into an elliptical, polar, nearly sun-synchronous earth orbit and decayed on September 25th 1975. Recorded on September 7th 1975 on 137.290 MHz by Greg Roberts.

ANS
#07427
(1974-070A)

ANS (Astronomical Netherlands Satellite) was an earth-orbiting, sun-synchronous satellite, designed as an astronomical observatory. Its lifetime was 20 months. Recorded on 137.890 MHz using an SSB receiver on October 30th 1974 by Greg Roberts.

Aug 30th 1974

130 kg

Recorded on June 7th 1975 on 137.890 MHz in CW by Greg Roberts.

Both files recorded on June 7th 1975 on 137.890 MHz in AM and CW by Greg Roberts.

Intasat
#07531
(1974-089C)

Intasat was launched together with Oscar 7 and NOAA-4. This first Spanish satellite was a small, magnetically oriented, spin stabilized spacecraft carrying a beacon experiment to study the ionosphere. It was turned off after 2 years. Recorded in AM mode on September 1st 1975 on 136.710 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Nov 15th 1974

20.4 kg

CASTOR
D5B
#07802
(1975-039B)

CASTOR's primary mission objective was to study the upper atmosphere density variations. Secondary objectives included a study of gravity field perturbations and a study of micro-meteorite impacts. It decayed on February 18th 1979. Both files recorded on 136.240 MHz on June 21st 1975 in CW by Greg Roberts.

May 17th 1975

76 kg

Both files recorded on June 21st 1975 on 136.240 MHz in FM by Greg Roberts.

Recorded in AM mode on September 1st 1975 on 136.250 MHz by Greg Roberts.

OSO-8
#07970
(1975-057A)

OSO-8 was supposed to perform solar physics experiments above the atmosphere during a complete solar cycle and to map the entire celestial sphere for direction and intensity of UV light, X-ray radiation, and gamma-ray radiation. Unfortunately it went out of service in September 1978 and decayed on July 9th 1986. Recorded by Greg Roberts on 136.920 MHz in CW on June 21st 1975 just 1 hour after its launch.

June 21st 1975

1064 kg

Recorded on June 21st 1975 in AM just 1 hour after its launch by Greg Roberts.

Meteor 2-01
#08026
(1975-064A)

Meteor 2-01 was recorded twice in the 137 MHz band in FM on November 7th 1975 by Greg Roberts.

Jul 11th 1975

2800 kg

Meteor 2-01 was recorded also twice in the 137 MHz band in FM in the afternoon of June 6th 1998 by DD1US.

Click on the picture on the right to access a collection of APT pictures received from Meteor 2-1 in 1998 by DD1US.

COS B
#08062
(1975-072A)

COS B (Cosmic Ray Satellite) was a scientific satellite developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to study extraterrestrial gamma radiation in the 25-MeV to 1-GeV energy range from a highly elliptical orbit. Recorded twice in CW/AM mode on September 2nd 1975 on 136.950 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Aug 9th 1975

277.5 kg

Symphonie-B
Symphonie 2
#08132
(1975-077A)

Symphonie 2 was a French-German, geostationary, equatorial experimental communications satellite. It provided 1200 telephone circuits and eight voice and two color TV channels which operate between 4 and 6 GHz. Recorded on August 29th 1975 on 136.800 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Aug 27th 1975

400 kg

D-2B Aura
#08332
(1975-092A)

The French Astronomy Satellite D2B carried an EUV experiment for solar and atmospheric investigations and a set of UV experiments for making stellar, zodiacal light, integrated sky background and stellar observations. The data transmission rate was 256 b/s for real-time data and 11 kb/s for stored data at a telemetry frequency of 136.740 MHz. The stabilization system failed on December 28th 1976, thereby terminating operation of the spacecraft. Recorded on October 6th 1975 in CW/AM on 136.740 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Sep 27th 1975

115 kg

Meteor 2-02
#09661
(1977-002A)

Meteor 2-02 was a meteorological satellite transmitting APT on 137.300 MHz (5W). Picture received at or before December 30th 1992 by DD1US.
I am searching for sound files. Please send them to   

Jan 7th 1977

2800 kg

GOES 3
#10953
(1978-062A)

GOES 3, known as GOES-C before becoming operational, is an American geostationary weather and communications satellite. It was originally built for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as part of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system, and was launched in June 1978. It is positioned in geostationary orbit, from where it was initially used for weather forecasting in the United States. Since ceasing to function as a weather satellite in 1989, it has been used as a communications satellite, and having spent over thirty one years in operation, it is one of the oldest functioning satellites in orbit. Especially the Amundsen-Scott Station at the South Pole is using the 1.5 MBit/s link for voice and data.

Jun 16th 1978

294 kg

GOES 3 VHF telemetry downlink was received on 136.380 MHz in SSB on October 3rd 2013 at 23:27 UTC by Raydel CM2ESP in Havanna/Cuba. Raydel used a horizontal Moxon antenna fixed pointed to Zenith and a RTL-SDR Dongle with a 35dB preamplifier. Recording kindly provided by Raydel CM2ESP.

Cosmos 1241
Istrebitel Sputnikov
IS
#12149
(
1981-006A)

Cosmos 1241 was a Soviet DS-P1-M target satellite launched from the Plesetsk cosmodrome aboard a Kosmos rocket. It was an ASAT (anti-satellite) target for the Cosmos 1243 and 1258 interceptors.
It was designated the IS ("Istrebitel Sputnikov", fighter satellite). The orbital parameters of the target satellite would already be known before launch, and the interceptor would be pre-programmed with those parameters. After being placed into an initial parking orbit by the launch vehicle, the interceptor's engine would make a number of maneuvers to intercept with the target, and at the appropriate moment, blow itself up together with the target. The interception was intended to take place on the first to third orbit, although it would be possible to make repeated attempts in case the target was missed.
The Istrebitel Sputnikov was approximately spherical in form and had a total mass of 1,400 kg. It consisted of two sections: the main section, which contained the guidance and targeting, computational and optical homing systems, and the 300 kg explosive charge; and the engine section. The body of the interceptor was designed so that after the explosion it would fragment into 12 groups of shrapnel. The specified radius of guaranteed target destruction was 1 km. However in a head-on intercept, only 400 m radius was guaranteed, while in a chase intercept, a 2 km radius of destruction could be achieved. The engine was capable of numerous quick starts and restarts, with a total operating time of 300 seconds.

Jan 21st 1981

650 kg

This signal of the Anti-Satellite Test (ASAT) target was received on 145 MHz on  February 2nd 1981 by Sven Grahn.

COSMOS 1249
US-A
RORSAT
#12319
(
1981-021A)

Cosmos 1249 was a russian nuclear powered Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome aboard a Tsyklon 2 rocket. The Russian name for this series of satellites was Upravlenniye Sputnik Aktivny (US-A). The RORSATs were designed to search the oceans for US Navy task forces and other shipping using a side-looking radar operating at 8.2 GHz. These highly maneuverable satellites had a orbit with an inclination of about 65° which was initially about 255 high (LEO) and after the nuclear reactor degraded in power the orbit was raised to a about 900km circular disposal orbit (MEO). Cosmos-1249 operated  105 days in the LEO orbit.

Mar 5th 1981

3800 kg

Enclosed FSK, PDM signal was received on 19.542 MHz on April 26th 1981 at 07:00 UTC by Sven Grahn.

COSMOS 1266
US-A
RORSAT
#12409
(1981-037A)

Cosmos 1266 was a russian nuclear powered Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome aboard a Tsyklon 2 rocket. COSMOS-1266 was the tandem satellite to COSMOS-1249 and stayed only 8 days in LEO orbit.
More information on the RORSAT/US-A satellites can be found on the excellent website of Sven Grahn.

Apr 21st 1981

3800 kg

Enclosed “pulsed” FSK/PDM signal was received on 19.542 MHz on May 2nd 1981 at 04:10 UTC by Sven Grahn .

Meteosat 2
#12554
(1981-057A)

Meteosat-2 was a spin-stabilized cylindrical meteorological satellite in a geostationary orbit at 0° longitude. It transmitted weather pictures on the downlink frequencies 1691.0 MHz and 1694.5 MHz. Recorded in FM by Greg Roberts.

Jun 19th 1981

282 kg

Lansat 5
Landsat-D1
#14780
(1984-021A)

The Landsat 5 satellite was identical to Landsat 4. This experimental earth resources monitoring system featured new powerful remote-sensing capabilities (incl. higher resolution and data rate) of the thematic mapper (TM). It had a complete end-to-end highly automated new generation data system  which was a major step forward in global remote-sensing applications. The spectrum plot of the S-band downlink at 2287.5 MHz was recorded on February 26th 2012 at 05:37UTC by Loren WA7SKT.

Mar 1st 1984

1407 kg

NOAA 9
NOAA-F
#15427
(1984-123A)

NOAA-9 was also called NOAA-F. APT downlink frequency was 137.620 MHz (inoperative), HRPT downlink frequencies were 1702.5 MHz and 1707.0 MHz, Beacon frequency was 137.770 MHz (on command). Picture received at or before December 30th 1992 by DD1US.

Dec 12th 1984

1418 kg

On November 6th 2010 at 15:22h UTC NOAA-9 transmitted a plain CW carrier on the downlink frequency 137.504 MHz. Received, recorded and kindly provided by Patrick Hajagos.

AUSSAT-1
AUSSAT A1
OPTUS-A1
#15993
(1985-076B)

Aussat 1 was released from the Space Shuttle on August 29th 1985. This spacecraft was Australia's first dedicated communications spacecraft. It was a Hughes HS-376 satellite, and it operated with extremely tight pointing accuracies using a new triple dish spot beam antenna designed specifically for Australia. It provided the first continuous television and radio facility to thousands of remote Australian homesteads and communities. It also provided a real-time communications relay for Australian air traffic control, receiving aircraft signals relayed from VHF grand stations. The satellite was spin-stabilized and ejected from the payload bay attached to a PAM perigee kick stage. The satellite operated at the 14/12 GHz Ku band, with an effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) of 47 dBW for the spot beams and 36 dBW for FSS.

Aug 29th 1985

655 kg

This recording was made during the release of Aussat from the Space Shuttle. It is part of the compilation "The Conquest of Space" of the Astronautical Society of Western Australia and kindly provided by Jos Heymann.

COSMOS 1766
OKEAN-O1 #1
#16881
(1986-055A)

Cosmos 1766 was an oceanographic satellite equipped with optical scanners and radar imaging devices. Recorded on 137.400 MHz in FM by Greg Roberts.

Jun 28th 1986

1950 kg

Enclosed signal of an image transmission was received on 466.5 MHz on January 7th 1990 by Sven Grahn.

NOAA 10
NOAA-G
#16969
(1986-073A)

NOAA-10 was also called NOAA-Gand included a search and rescue (SAR) system. Its primary purpose was meteorological though. APT downlink frequency is 137.500 MHz, HRPT downlink frequency is 1698.0 MHz, Beacon frequency is 136.770 MHz. Picture received at or before December 30th 1992 by DD1US.

Sep 17th 1986

386 kg

I am searching for sound files. Please send them to   

ECS-4
EUTELSAT 4
#18351
(1987-078B)

The EUTELSAT I series of satellites was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of the European Communications Satellite (ECS) program. They served both public and private traffic, including telephone services, fax, data, land mobile service, and television and radio programming. PCM/FSK/PM transmission recorded on 137.142 MHz by Mike D. Kenny.

Sep 16th 1987

1175 kg

Navigation satellite OSCAR-27
Transit-O 27
OSCAR(NAV)27
NNS 30270
#18361
(1987-080A)

Transit-O 27 was a US Navy navigation satellite launched by a Scout G rocket. Transit, one of the first operational satellite systems, was also known as the Navy Navigation Satellite (NNS).
The Transit spacecraft were developed for updating the inertial navigation systems on board US Navy Polaris submarines, and later for civilian use. Transit receivers used the known characteristics of the satellite's orbit, measured the Doppler shift of the satellite's radio signal, and thereby calculated the receivers position on the earth. As a single spacecraft travelled overhead, the user measured the Doppler shift over a 15 minute period by receiving timing marks and satellite orbital information on two separate frequencies, 149.99 and 399.97 MHz. These signals were corrected for ionospheric refraction and the information was then fed into the users navigation system.
Individual Transit satellites operated for over 10 years. Technical breakthroughs during the program included gravity gradient stabilization, the use of radio-isotope thermoelectric generators (RTG), and navigation satellite technologies later used in the GPS system. Transit was superseded by the Navstar global positioning system. The use of the satellites for navigation was discontinued at the end of 1996 but the satellites continued transmitting and became the Navy Ionospheric Monitoring System (NIMS).
Enclosed signal was received on 149.985 MHz on January 15
th 2000 by Sven Grahn.

Sep 16th 1987

59 kg

NOSS 9
USA 32
P-11 5103
#19460
(1988-078A)

US Navy Ocean Surveillance Satellite 9 (NOSS 9) was launched from Vandenberg AFB aboard an Titan-2(23)G rocket into a near-circular 790 km orbit with 85° inclination. It placed a cluster of one primary satellite and three smaller sub-satellites (that trailed along at distances of several hundred kilometers) into low polar orbit. This satellite array determined the location of radio and radars transmitters, using triangulation, and the identity of naval units, by analysis of the operating frequencies and transmission patterns.

Sep 5th 1988

1700 kg

NOSS 9 has multiple S-band downlinks around 2202 MHz. USA 32 was received on May 10th 2013 at 09:50 UTC by Paul Marsh. Spectrum plots and audio recording kindly provided by Paul Marsh M0YET.

NOAA 11
NOAA-H
#19531
(1988-089A)

NOAA-11 was also called NOAA-H. APT downlink frequency is 137.620 MHz, HRPT downlink frequency is 1707.0 MHz, Beacon frequency is 137.770 MHz. Picture received at or before Dec 31st 1992 by DD1US.
I am searching for sound files. Please send them to   

Sep 24th 1988

386 kg

AKEBONO
EXOS-D
#19822
(1989-016A)

The purpose of this Japanese mission was to investigate the particle acceleration regions above the auroral region in order to develop a better understanding of the acceleration mechanism and of its relation to substorm phenomena. The spacecraft was spin-stabilized with a rotation rate of 7.5 rpm. The attitude was magnetically controlled with spacecraft axis pointing to the sun. The satellite control and main telemetry station is at Kagoshima.

Feb 21st 1989

294 kg

The S-Band downlink on 2280.5 MHz of Akebono was received and enclosed FFT plot was generated in April 2014 by Milen Rangelov.

FLTSATCOM 8
USA 046
#20253
(1989-077A)

FLTSATCOM 8 (Fleetsatcom) is a geostationary (23°W) military communications satellite. It has 23 communications channels in the UHF frequency band from 244 to 263 MHz. Sometimes some of the channels get hijacked by pirates and used for private purpose. Such an event was recorded on on Jan 5th 2008 on 255.550 MHz in NFM by Chris Gross in Pennsylvania using a Yupiteru MVT-7100.

Sep 25th 1989

1043 kg

Another example for a pirate signal was recorded on 255.550 MHz on Dec 16th 2006 in NFM by Chris Gross in Pennsylvania using a Yupiteru MVT-7100.

NAVSTAR 22
Navstar-2A 1
GPS 23
USA 66
#20959
(1990-103A)

NAVSTAR GPS (global positioning system) satellite of the 2nd generation. These type IIA navigation satellites are orbiting the Earth in an altitude of 20000 km with an inclination of 55°. The L1 (for civilian and military use) downlink frequency is 1575.42 MHz, the L2 (only for military use) downlink frequency is 1227.60 MHz.

Nov 26th 1990

1816 kg

Enclosed GPS signal was received on April 7th 2011 on 1575,42 MHz in SSB by Greg Roberts.

Meteor 3-4
#21232
(1991-030A)

Meteor 3-4 transmitted APT on 137.??? MHz. Picture received at or before Dec 30th 1992 by DD1US.

Apr 24th 1991

2150 kg

NOAA 12
NOAA-D
#21263
(1991-032A)

NOAA-12 was also called NOAA-D. APT downlink frequency is 137.500 MHz, HRPT downlink frequency is 1698.0 MHz, Beacon frequency is 136.770 MHz. NOAA 12 was de-commissioned (permanently switched off) on 10 August 2007 after more than 16 years of service. Received on May 5th 1998 by DD1US.

May 14th 1991

590 kg

In the year 1998 I received a number of APT pictures from NOAA-12. Click on the picture on the right to have a look at this collection.

TUBSAT-A
#21577
(1991-050D)

Tubsat-A (Technische Universität Berlin Satellite) was a cube of 38cm length and launched together with ERS1 on an Ariane-4 from Kourou into a sun-synchronous polar orbit with an inclination of 98 degree and a height of 780km. TUBSAT-A transmitted telemetry (including 12 temperature and 20 voltage values) and command data on 143.075 MHz in 1200bd FFSK raw binary ASCII.

July 17th 1991

35 kg

Enclosed signal was received in May 2006
in FM on 143.075 MHz by Maik . You can also download the decoded binary file when clicking on the icon in the upper right. The header is "
UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU
UUUUTUBSAT Communication Unit..Technischd
Universitaet Berlin..Institut fuer Raumfahrttechnik..
Base Data System…
".
Recording kindly provided by Maik Hermenau.

Meteor 3-5
TOMS
#21655
(1991-056A)

Cooperative space mission between the US and the former USSR to map global ozone from space using a Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) designed and operated by NASA. Meteor 3-5 transmitted APT on 137.850 MHz. Received on May 1st 1998 by DD1US.

Aug 15th 1991

2150 kg

In the year 1998 I received a number of APT pictures from Meteor 3-5. Click on the picture on the right to have a look at this collection. Audio recorded on May 1st 1998 by DD1US.

COSMOS 2184
#21937
(1992-020A)

Cosmos 2184 was part of a 6-satellite Russian military navigation system distributed in orbital planes spaced 30 degrees apart and launched from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome aboard a Cosmos rocket. Navigation information was derived from Doppler-shifted VHF transmissions (approximately 150 and 400 MHz) of the satellite position and orbital data. Recorded on Dec 16th 2006 on 149.910 MHz by Chris Gross in Pennsylvania using a Yupiteru MVT-7100.

Apr 15th 1992

825 kg

HealthSat-2
Healthsat-II
WavSat-1
#22827
(1993-061E)

Healtsat-2 joined HealthSat-1 (UoSAT-3) as secondary microsatellite in the HealthNet system of SatelLife. It was build by SSTL in Surrey/UK based on its MicroSat-70 platform and launched together with the primary payload SPOT-3 and several other microsats into a LEO (low earth orbit) on Ariane 40 V59 from Kourou. This store and forward communications satellite provides a communications network especially for remote regions. For instance it relays medical emergency information from Africa to hospitals and health documentation centers. HealthSat-2 feature 3 uplink receivers at VHF and 2 redundant downlink transmitters at UHF. It uses omni-directional satellite antennas. The modulation and data rate is switchable between 1200bd AFSK and 9600bd FSK in the uplink and 9600bd FSK and 38400 bps FSK in the downlink. It uses the AX.25 packet communications protocol developed for Amateur Radio. The output power of the transmitter is adapted by computer control between 1W and 10W. Under a unique partnership agreement between Wavix, SatelLife, and VITA, the satellite under the name WavSat-1 continues its humitarian mission.

Sep 26th 1993

48 kg

NAVSTAR 35
Navstar 2A-14
GPS 2-23
USA 96
#22877
(1993-068A)

NAVSTAR GPS (global positioning system) satellite of the 2nd generation. These type IIA navigation satellites are orbiting the Earth in an altitude of 20200 km with an inclination of 55°. The L1 (for civilian and military use) downlink frequency is 1575.42 MHz, the L2 (only for military use) downlink frequency is 1227.60 MHz.

Oct 26th 1993

840 kg

Enclosed GPS signal of NAVSTAR 35 was received on May lst 2011 on 1575,4 MHz in SSB by Greg Roberts.

OKEAN 4 (1-7)
#23317
(1994-066A)

Okean 4 (1-7) was a Russian / Ukrainian oceanic / meteorological satellite. It transmitted on 137.400 MHz. Picture received on March 21st 1998 by DD1US. The enclosed audio file recorded on 137.400 MHz was kindly provided by Mike DK3WN.

Oct 11th 1994

1950 kg

NOAA 14
#23455
(1994-089A)

Besides an imaging radiometer, NOAA 14 (also called NOAA-J) carried optical sounders to monitor temperature and moisture content in the atmosphere, and counters to measure energetic electrons and protons. APT downlink frequency is 137.620 MHz, HRPT downlink frequency is 1698.0 MHz, Beacon frequency is 136.770 MHz. The audio file was recorded on March 8th 1998 by DD1US.

Dec 30th 1994

1421 kg

The picture on the right was received on March 1st 1998 by DD1US and shows a comparison of the APT picture received on 137.620 MHz to the HRPT picture (derived from the internet).

In the year 1998 I received a number of APT pictures from NOAA 14. Click on the second picture on the right to have a look at this collection.

ERS-2
ERS 2
#23560
(1995-021A)

ERS 2 is an ESA earth resources spacecraft launched by an Ariane rocket from the Kourou Space Center in French Guiana. The spacecraft carries a synthetic aperture radar for topographic studies, a wide beam radar (both in the C-band), a radar altimeter for measuring ocean surface and waves, a radiometer for measuring ocean surface temperatures, and an optical Global Ozone Monitor (GOME) that monitors ozone and ozone-destroying gases and carries reflectors for laser tracking. It has a 6.5 gigabit tape recorder to record data from a full orbit.

Apr 21st 1995

2516 kg

The S-Band downlink on 2225 MHz of ERS-2 was received and enclosed FFT plot was generated in May 2014 by Milen Rangelov.

SICH-1
#23657
(1995-046A)

SICH-1 offered RADAR and thermal microwave imagery in addition to the more usual visible light transmissions. Resolution was approx. 1 km. SICH-1 transmitted APT on 137.400 MHz and higher resolution pictures at 465 MHz. The enclosed audio file recorded on 137.400 MHz was kindly provided by Mike DK3WN.

The APT signal was decoded and kindly provided by Mark B.

Aug 31st 1995

1950 kg

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Launch
Date

Weight

If you have further sound tracks from space objects please let me know. I will be happy to post them here on my homepage. Many thanks in advance.

Vy 55 & 73 de Matthias DD1US               


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